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Gender Not Listed Here

In "A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and OtherWise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey" by Jack Harrison, Jaime Grant, and Jody L. Herman, we have a statistical peek into what it means to identify in some way other than "male" or "female." This page attempts to briefly summarize some of the key findings.

Quick Background

  • 6,450 transgender and gender nonconforming people answered a seventy-question survey (2008 National Transgender Discrimination Survey)
  • Question 3 asked, “What is your primary gender identity today?â€
  • Response options included: A) Male/man (B) Female/woman (C) Part time as one gender, part time as another (D) A gender not listed here, please specify _______

Q3GNL: Gender Not Listed Here

13% of respondents answered question 3 with "Gender Not Listed Here" --  with 860 personal responses to the "please specify" prompt.

The majority of those respondents (42%) wrote in "genderqueer" (39%) or some variation thereof (2.9%).

Most (73%) of GNL respondents were assigned female as birth (compare only 40% of the full sample).

Demographics

In all of the following details, the GNL set of respondents is compared to the binary identified (i.e. man, woman, part-time) set of respondents.  Comparisons only reflect those who responded to the survey. GNL respondents were:

  • Younger: 89% of GNL were under the age of 45 compared to 68% of the binary identified respondents.
  • Less White, More People of Color: 70% White GNL (vs 77% White binary); 18% multi racial GNL (vs. 11% multi racial binary); 5% Black GNL (vs. 4% Black binary); 3% Asian GNL (vs. 2% Asian binary)
  • Less Latino/a: 4% Latino/a GNL (vs. 5% Latino/a binary)
  • Less Mid Western/Southern: Less likely to live in Southern and/or MidWestern states -- and more likely to live in California, the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and the West.
  • Higher education: 23% GNL with graduate degree (vs. 20% of binary); 35% of GNL with college degree (vs. 26% of binary).
  • Lower income: 21% GNL living in under $10,000 annual income, (vs.  14% binary).

Discrimination and Violence

In all of the following details, the GNL set of respondents is compared to the binary identified (i.e. man, woman, part-time) set of respondents.  Comparisons only reflect those who responded to the survey. GNL respondents were:

K-12 Education

  • Higher rates of harassment (K-12): 83% GNL (vs. 77% binary)
  • Higher rates of sexual assault (K-12): 16% GNL (vs. 11% binary)

Workplace

  • Less likely job loss due to trans bias: 19% GNL (vs. 27% binaary)
  • More likely out at work: 76% GNL (vs. 56% binary)
  • Same levels of harassment and abuse: 90% for GNL and binary
  • More likely working in informal/underground economies: 20% GNL (vs. 15% binary)

Health and Health Care

  • Less likely to have been refused health care: 14% GNL (vs. 20% binary)
  • Less likely to seek health care, fearing discrimination: 36% GNL (vs. 27% binary)
  • More likely HIV positive: 2.9% GNL (vs. 2.5% binary)
  • Less likely to know HIV status: 11% GNL (vs. 9% binary)
  • More likely to have attempted suicide: 43% GNL (vs. 40% binary)

Police

  • More likely to have experienced police harassment: 31% GNL (vs. 21% binary)
  • More uncomfortable seeking aid from police: 25% GNL (vs. 19% binary)

Violence

  • More likely to have been assaulted for gender bias: 32% GNL (vs. 25% binary)
  • More likely to have been sexually assaulted for gender bias: 15% GNL (vs. 9% binary)

More on Non-Binary Identities

Check out the rest of our "Beyond the Binary" basics for more resources.

More on NTDS Results

Check out our list of reports on NTDS results.


 
Trans Basics
Gender
Gender vs. Sexuality
Transgender
Beyond the Binary
Intersex
Labels and Vocabulary
Myths and Sterotypes
Children and Youth
Is it an Illness?